Anchorage Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Forum Podcasts

Preserving Inupiat Culture in Bootlegger Cove Clay - Ed Mighel (video available)

February 12, 2023 Tile Artist Ed Mighell Season 2023 Episode 212
Preserving Inupiat Culture in Bootlegger Cove Clay - Ed Mighel (video available)
Anchorage Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Forum Podcasts
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Anchorage Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Forum Podcasts
Preserving Inupiat Culture in Bootlegger Cove Clay - Ed Mighel (video available)
Feb 12, 2023 Season 2023 Episode 212
Tile Artist Ed Mighell

Ed Mighell is an artist specializing in handmade ceramic tiles depicting Alaska animals and plants and images associated with his Alaska Native heritage. Eds mother is Inupiat from Point Hope. His father is from Massachusetts and was stationed in the Arctic with the Army Corps of Engineers where he met Eds mother. Ed has a degree in civil engineering and a fine arts degree in printmaking, both from the University of Alaska Anchorage. He left his engineering career behind to pursue his art, which is collected throughout America. He feels comforted to be playing a role in reviving an old art form in Alaska, as the last native potter died around 1880. The main ingredient in his tile body is the glacial clay from the mudflats next to Anchorage, where Ed lives with his wife, Kathryn.

Video © KTUU Channel 2/Alaska's News Source.  Used with permission - https://www.dropbox.com/s/qq8ejifnid1uh46/TAS%20ALASKA%20TILES-PKG.mp4?dl=0

Show Notes

Ed Mighell is an artist specializing in handmade ceramic tiles depicting Alaska animals and plants and images associated with his Alaska Native heritage. Eds mother is Inupiat from Point Hope. His father is from Massachusetts and was stationed in the Arctic with the Army Corps of Engineers where he met Eds mother. Ed has a degree in civil engineering and a fine arts degree in printmaking, both from the University of Alaska Anchorage. He left his engineering career behind to pursue his art, which is collected throughout America. He feels comforted to be playing a role in reviving an old art form in Alaska, as the last native potter died around 1880. The main ingredient in his tile body is the glacial clay from the mudflats next to Anchorage, where Ed lives with his wife, Kathryn.

Video © KTUU Channel 2/Alaska's News Source.  Used with permission - https://www.dropbox.com/s/qq8ejifnid1uh46/TAS%20ALASKA%20TILES-PKG.mp4?dl=0